So now the debate about the dissemination of information via the internet is becoming a hot topic. There are more news stories being written about it and more conversations happening around it. Unfortunately, those conversations have broadened to include the political world. I say unfortunately because there aren’t many people actually explaining what’s happening in plain terms. Initially the conversation was happening in tech/digital circles and it was filled with the jargon of those industries. Now that it has expanded to the political circles, it’s filled with the jargon of that industry.

No one is stopping to take the time to truly break down what’s happening in plain terms. It has become a conversation between large corporate entities and larger than life public personas which tends to go over the heads of the everyday individual. This is bad because the people that will be most affected by these regulatory changes being proposed are the everyday individuals. If the internet service providers (ISPs) begin to charge for access to the internet, the everyday individual will begin to have a tougher time surfing freely and accessing all of the valuable information online. If the government begins to regulate the information being shared online, the same thing will begin to happen.

Yes, the big communications companies will have to make some changes to the way they operate if the government begins to regulate the internet, but ultimately those changes will filter down to the everyday individual. Yes, large organizations will have to make some changes to the way they share information, but ultimately those changes will filter down to the everyday individual.

I hope you’re starting to get my point here.

So I’m talking to my fellow everyday individuals. Let’s start with the basics.

What is Net Neutrality?

Net neutrality is the idea that any and all information being shared online is readily available for anyone who’s surfing the internet.

What is free and open internet?

Free and open internet is another way to say net neutrality. It’s the idea that the internet is free and open to anyone who has the ability to access it. Whether you’re doing it at home on your computer, on your smartphone, at work or at the local library, if you can get online, you have full access to all of the information that’s available.

So we’ll stop there. Do you have any questions?